Amateur Astrophotographie Landos France

Galaxies

Leo Triplet

M66, M65, NGC 3628

Leo triplet wide

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Alt-5
Camera/filters: QHY12 OSC
Exposure: 43x600sec 20/21 april 2018

The Leo Triplet (also known as the M66 Group) is a small group of galaxies about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. This galaxy group consists of the spiral galaxies M65, M66, and NGC 3628.

Le triplet du Lion (aussi appelé le groupe de M66) est un petit amas de galaxies situé à environ 35 millions d’années-lumière dans le constellation du Lion. Cet amas regroupe les galaxies spirales M65, M66, et NGC 3628.


M33 Triangulum Galaxy

Triangulum Galaxy

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Alt-5
Camera/filters: QHY12 OSC
Exposure: 10x600sec 09 january 2018

The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light-years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, behind the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye.

It is the third most massive galaxy in the local Group after the Andromeda galaxy and the Milky Way, and ahead of the Great Magellanic Cloud; with an estimated mass of 60 billion solar masses, it accounts for only 5% of the mass of the Andromeda galaxy, with dark matter constituting nearly 85% of this mass.

La Galaxie du Triangulum est une galaxie spirale située à environ 3 millions d’années-lumière de la Terre dans la constellation du Triangulum. C’est l’un des objets permanents les plus éloignés que l’on puisse voir à l’œil nu.

C’est la troisième galaxie la plus massive du Groupe local après la galaxie d’Andromède et la Voie lactée, et devant le Grand Nuage de Magellan ; avec une masse évaluée à 60 milliards de masses solaires, elle ne représente que 5 % de la masse de la galaxie d’Andromède, la matière noire constituant près de 85 % de cette masse


Galaxy M33

M33_LRGB_hp

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure:20×300 L,R,G,B all 2bin
January 2017

The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light-years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598, and is sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy, a nickname it shares with Messier 101. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, behind the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye.

The galaxy is the smallest spiral galaxy in the Local Group and it is believed to be a satellite of the Andromeda Galaxy due to their interactions, velocities and proximity to one another in the night sky. It also has an H-II nucleus

La galaxie du Triangle, également appelée M33, est une galaxie spirale de type SA(s)cd appartenant au Groupe local et située dans la constellation du Triangle. Sans doute satellite de la galaxie d’Andromède, sa distance au Soleil est assez mal connue. Les mesures actuelles donnent une distance allant de environ 0,73 Mpc (2,38 millions d’a.l.) à environ 0,94 Mpc (3,07 millions d’a.l.).

C’est la troisième galaxie la plus massive du Groupe local après la galaxie d’Andromède et la Voie lactée, et devant le Grand Nuage de Magellan ; avec une masse évaluée à 60 milliards de masses solaires, elle ne représente que 5 % de la masse de la galaxie d’Andromède, la matière noire constituant près de 85 % de cette masse.

Cataloguée pour la première fois par Charles Messier en 1764, la galaxie du Triangle avait probablement déjà été observée auparavant, étant visible à l’œil nu lorsque les conditions s’y prêtent. Son étude astronomique remonte au moins au milieu du XIXe siècle, puisque William Parsons, 3e comte de Rosse, avait, dès 1850, suggéré que sa structure présentait des spirales


M95 with Supernova

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 17×600 Lum, 7×600 RGB all 1bin
30 March 2012

Messier 95 (also known as M95 or NGC 3351) is a barred spiral galaxy about 38 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781, and catalogued by Charles Messier four days later. On March 16th, 2012, a supernova was discovered in M95.


M99 Pin-wheel Nebula

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 17×600 Lum, 7×600 RGB all 1bin
29 March 2012

Messier 99 (also known as M99 or NGC 4254) is an unbarred spiral galaxy approximately 50 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices.

The galaxy has a normal looking arm and an extended arm that is less tightly wound. A bridge of neutral hydrogen gas links NGC 4254 with VIRGOHI21. The gravity from the possible dark galaxy VIRGOHI21 may have distorted M99 and drawn out the gas bridge, as the two galaxy-sized objects have a close encounter, before they go their separate ways. It is expected that the drawn out arm will relax to match the normal arm once the encounter is over. Three supernovae have been observed in this galaxy.

More galaxys aroud M99


Revision of NGC 3718

NGC3718

NGC3718

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 37×600 Lum, 12×600 RGB all 1bin
23-24 March 2012

I did some changes with the processing to make the background less noisy

Discovered by W. Herschel in April 1789 NGC 3718 is located in the constellation of the big dipper and is to be categorized as a Seyfert galaxy. It holds 8.2 by 3.5 arc minutes and appears to be 10m6 bright for the visual observer. While the galaxy is in a distance of some 52 Mio light years from earth, it’s warped spiral shape is pertubated by the neighbourghing galaxy NGC 3729, which is devided from 3718 by 150000 light years. Both are therefor interacting in a gravitational way, like the fainter galaxy couple south to 3718. These group of galaxies (Hickson 56 by name) is more than 400 Mio lightyears away from our planet.


NGC 4216

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 49×600 Lum, 9×600 RGB all 1bin
26 March 2012

NGC 4216 is a metal-rich intermediate spiral galaxy located not far from the center of the Virgo Cluster] of galaxies, roughly 40 million light-years away.


NGC3718

NGC3718 alt

NGC3718 alt

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 37×600 Lum, 12×600 RGB all 1bin
23-24 March 2012

Discovered by W. Herschel in April 1789 NGC 3718 is located in the constellation of the big dipper and is to be categorized as a Seyfert galaxy. It holds 8.2 by 3.5 arc minutes and appears to be 10m6 bright for the visual observer. While the galaxy is in a distance of some 52 Mio light years from earth, it’s warped spiral shape is pertubated by the neighbourghing galaxy NGC 3729, which is devided from 3718 by 150000 light years. Both are therefor interacting in a gravitational way, like the fainter galaxy couple south to 3718. These group of galaxies (Hickson 56 by name) is more than 400 Mio lightyears away from our planet.


M 100 Galaxy

M100_DBE-lrgb-ps_cropM100_DBE-lrgb-ps2
Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 49×600 Lum, 9×600 RGB all 1bin
16 March 2012

Messier 100 (also known as NGC 4321) is an example of a grand design spiral galaxy located within the southern part of constellation Coma Berenices. It is one of the brightest galaxies in the Virgo cluster, approximately 55 million light-years distant from Earth and has a diameter of 160,000 light years. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain on March 15, 1781 and was subsequently entered in Messier’s catalogue of nebulae and star clusters after Charles Messier made observations of his own on April 13, 1781. The galaxy was one of the first spirals discovered, and was listed as 1 of 14 spiral nebulae by Lord William Parsons of Rosse in 1850. A satellite galaxy named NGC 4323 is present within M100.

Some galaxies near by M100

M100-GX


Hickson 44

Hickson 44

Hickson 44

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 49×600 Lum, 9×600 RGB all 1bin

Hickson 44 is a cluster of four gravitationally bound galaxies that lie relatively nearby to our own Milky Way. Each of these galaxies shows signs of interaction, such warped disks or a large bright bar. The entire grouping spans 15′, small enough to be seen together in the same field of view. The brightest member is NGC 3190, the smaler Gx are NGC 3193 and NGC 3185 nearly-face-on barred spiral. The faintest member is the 14th magnitude NGC 3187, a spiral galaxy with a bright bar.


Black Eye Galaxy

M64 Black Eye Galaxy

M64 Black Eye Galaxy

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 10×600 Lum, 5×600 RGB all 1bin
02 March 2012

The Black Eye Galaxy (also called Sleeping Beauty Galaxy; designated Messier 64, M64, or NGC 4826) was discovered by Edward Pigott in March 1779, and independently by Johann Elert Bode in April of the same year, as well as by Charles Messier in 1780. It has a spectacular dark band of absorbing dust in front of the galaxy’s bright nucleus, giving rise to its nicknames of the “Black Eye” or “Evil Eye” galaxy. M64 is well known among amateur astronomers because of its appearance in small telescopes. It is a spiral galaxy in the Coma Berenices constellation

Zoom

M64 Zoom

M64 Zoom


NGC 891

Ngc 891

NGC 891

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 4*12×600 Lum,RGB all 1bin

NGC 891 (also known as Caldwell 23) is an edge-on unbarred spiral galaxy about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Andromeda. It was discovered by William Herschel on October 6 1784. The galaxy is a member of the NGC 1023 group of galaxies in the Local Supercluster. It has an H II nucleus.[3]

The object is visible in small to moderate size telescopes as a faint elongated smear of light with a dust lane visible in larger apertures.

In 1999, the Hubble Space Telescope imaged NGC 891 in infrared.

In 2005, due to its attractiveness and scientific interest, NGC 891 was selected to be the first light image of the Large Binocular Telescope.[4]

Supernova SN 1986J was discovered on August 21, 1986 at apparent magnitude 14


M33 Triangulum Galaxy

 

M33

M33

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Mount CI700 Clestron
Camera/filters:QHY 12
exposure: 20×600 sec

The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598, and is sometimes informally referred to as the Pinwheel Galaxy, a nickname it shares with Messier 101. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, which includes the Milky Way Galaxy, the Andromeda Galaxy and about 30 other smaller galaxies. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye.


M51 Whirlpool Galaxy



The Whirlpool Galaxy
(also known as Messier 51a, M51a, or NGC 5194) is an interacting grand-design spiral galaxy that is estimated to be 23 ± 4 million light-years from the Milky Way Galaxy. in the constellation Canes Venatici. It is one of the most famous galaxies in the sky. The galaxy and its companion (NGC 5195) are easily observed by amateur astronomers, and the two galaxies may even be seen with binoculars. The Whirlpool Galaxy is also a popular target for professional astronomers, who study it to further understand galaxy structure (particularly structure associated with the spiral arms) and galaxy interactions.

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 25×600 Lum, 8×900 ha, 8×600 RGb all 1bin


NGC4490

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 12×900 Lum, 6×900 RGB all 1bin

This pair of galaxies often goes by the nickname of the “Cocoon Galaxy.” Each “blob” is actually a spiral galaxy that has been distorted by the other. Hints of spiral structure are still evident in the smaller galaxy. These galaxies have already passed their closest approach (perigalacticon) and are now speeding away from each other. A tail of stars stretches between the galaxies which are separated by at least 24,000 light years. All of this action takes place 40-50 million light years away. These interacting galaxies make a good real-world example for astronomers to compare computer models (simulations) of galactic collisions. Note the incredible number of starforming regions that have developed along facing sides of each galaxy.


NGC4631 The Whale

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 12×600 Lum, 6×600 RGB all 1bin

NGC 4631 (also known as the Whale Galaxy or Caldwell 32) is an edge-on spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. This galaxy’s slightly distorted wedge shape gives it the appearance of a herring or a whale, whence its nickname.[3] Because this nearby galaxy is seen edge-on from Earth, professional astronomers observe this galaxy to better understand the gas and stars located outside the plane of the galaxy.


M66 and M65 Galaxies


Messier 66 (also known as NGC 3627) is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 36 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1780. M66 is about 95 thousand light-years across[3] with striking dust lanes and bright star clusters along sweeping spiral arms.[4] M66 is part of the famous Leo Triplet, a small group of galaxies that also includes M65 and NGC 3628.

Messier 65 (also known as NGC 3623) is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1780. M65, M66, and NGC 3628 comprise the famous Leo Triplet, a small group of galaxies.

Optics/mount: 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon HA RGB
exposure: 10×600″ rgb 7X300″2bin


NGC 3628 Galaxy

NGC 3628, also known as Sarah’s Galaxy, is an unbarred spiral galaxy about 35 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1784. It has an approximately 300,000 light-years long tidal tail. NGC 3628 along with M65 and M66 form the famous Leo Triplet, a small group of galaxies. Its most conspicuous feature is the broad and obscuring band of dust located along the outer edge of its spiral arms, effectively transecting the galaxy to our view.

Optics/mount: 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon HA RGB
exposure: 20×600″ rgb 10X300″2bin


NGC2903 in the Leo

NGC2903-hp-neu

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
Exposure: 20×600 Lum, 6×600 RGB all 1bin
21 Feb 2012

NGC 2903 is a barred spiral galaxy about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by William Herschel who cataloged it on
November 16, 1784 @Wikipedia

NGC 2903 est une galaxie spirale barrée, située à environ 21 millions d’années-lumière, dans la constellation du Lion. Elle a été découverte par William Herschel le 16 novembre 1784. NGC 2905 est un nœud brillant (nuage d’étoiles) dans cette galaxie.@Wikipedia