Amateur Astrophotographie Landos France

Nebulas

NGC 7133/ 7129

Reflexions nebula

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 5*5×600 Lum,RGB all 1bin

NGC 7129 is a young compact star forming region which displays an unusual patchwork of colorful nebulosity and bright stars contrasted against the dust clouds of the Milky Way. The astronomical correlate of those colors and textures is the rich interplay that occurs between young stars and the surrounding interstellar medium. NGC 7129 contains several bright reflection nebulae including the large blue reflection cloud NGC 7133 and the unusual small yellow reflection cloud LBN497. Also conspicuous in the field are several bright Herbig-Haro objects, the signatures of young stellar objects soon to emerge in the main sequence. The dominant blue reflection nebula,


Witch Head Nebula IC2118

Wich head nebula

Wich head nebula

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Mount Alt-5ADN
Camera/filters:QHY 12
exposure: 20×900 sec

IC 2118 (also known as Witch Head Nebula due to its shape), is an extremely faint reflection nebula believed to be an ancient supernova remnant or gas cloud illuminated by nearby supergiant star Rigel in Orion. It lies in the Eridanus constellation, about 900 light-years from Earth. The nature of the dust particles, reflecting blue light better than red, is a factor in giving the Witch Head its blue color. Radio observations show substantial carbon monoxide emission throughout parts of IC 2118 an indicator of the presence of molecular clouds and star formation in the nebula. In fact candidates for pre-main sequence stars and some classic T-Tauri stars have been found deep within the nebula.[1]

The molecular clouds of IC 2118 are probably juxtaposed to the outer boundaries of the vast Orion-Eridanus bubble, a giant supershell of molecular hydrogen blown by the high mass stars of the Orion OB1 association. As the supershell expands into the interstellar medium favorable circumstances for star formation occur. IC 2118 is located in one such area.The wind blown appearance and cometary shape of the bright reflection nebula is highly suggestive of a strong association with the high mass luminous stars of Orion OB1. The fact that the heads of the cometary clouds of IC2118 point northeast towards the association is strong support of that relationship.


Antares Region

 

The Rho Ophiuchi

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Mount Alt-5ADN
CCD: QHY 12
exposure: mosaic 9x10x600 sec

The Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex is a dark nebula of gas and dust that is located 1° south of the star ρ Ophiuchi of the constellation Ophiuchus. At an estimated distance of 131 ± 3 parsecs, this cloud is one of the closest star-forming regions to the Solar System.

This cloud covers an angular area of 4.5° × 6.5° on the celestial sphere. It consists of two major regions of dense gas and dust. The first contains a star-forming cloud (L1688) and two filaments (L1709 and L1755), while the second has a star-forming region (L1689) and a filament (L1712–L1729). These filaments extend up to 10–17.5 parsecs in length and can be as narrow as 0.24 parsecs in width. Some of the structures within the complex appear to be the result of a shock front passing through the clouds from the direction of the neighboring Sco OB2 association.

Temperatures of the clouds range from 13–22 K, and there is a total of about 3,000 times the mass of the Sun in material. Over half of the mass of the complex is concentrated around the L1688 cloud, and this is the most active star-forming region. There are embedded infrared sources within the complex.[6] A total of 425 infrared sources have been detected near the L1688 cloud. These are presumed to be young stellar objects, including 16 classified as protostars, 123 T Tauri stars with dense circumstellar disks, and 77 weaker T Tauri stars with thinner disks. The last two categories of stars have estimated ages ranging from 100,000 to a million years.

The first brown dwarf to be identified in a star-forming region was Rho Oph J162349.8-242601, located in the Rho Ophiuchi cloud. One of the older objects at the edge of the primary star-forming region was found to be a circumstellar disk seen nearly edge on. It spans a diameter of 300 AU and contains at least twice the mass of Jupiter. The million-year-old star at the center of the disk has a temperature of 3,000 K and is emitting 0.4 times the luminosity of the Sun.


Melotte 15

Melotte15 wide

Melotte15 in the IC1805

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 22x900ha ,22×900 SII 10×900 OIII 1x1bin

The bright star cluster ( “open cluster”) centered in this image is known as Melotte15 after its discover, Philibert Jacques Melotte (1880-1961). Melotte 15 is embedded within and illuminates the central portion of the much larger glowing nebula identified as IC 1805. The interesting structure in the center of the image is a giant area of hydrogen gas that is caused to glow by the intense ultraviolet radiation from the massive stars of the Melotte 15 star cluster. It is estimated that this illuminated gas is more than 50 light years from the Melotte15 stars.

The nebula’s intense red output and its configuration are driven by the radiation emanating from a small group of stars near the nebula’s center. This open cluster of stars known as Melotte 15 contains a few bright stars nearly 50 times the mass of our Sun, and many more dim stars that are only a fraction of our Sun’s mass. The cluster used to contain a microquasar that was expelled millions of years ago.

The Heart Nebula, IC 1805, Sh2-190, lies some 7500 light years away from Earth and is located in the Perseus Arm of the Galaxy in the constellation Cassiopeia. This is an emission nebula showing glowing gas and darker dust lanes. The nebula is formed by plasma of ionized hydrogen and free electrons.@ wikipdia


Sh2-155

SH2.155

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi  Mount  CI700 Clestron
Camera/filters:QHY 12
exposure: 35×900 sec

The Cave Nebula, Sh2-155 or Caldwell 9, is a dim and very diffuse bright nebula within a larger nebula complex containing emission, reflection, and dark nebulosity. It is located in the constellation Cepheus.

Visually it is a difficult object, but with adequate exposure, makes a striking image. The nebula gets its name from the dark lane at the eastern side abutting the brightest curve of emission nebulosity which gives the appearance of a deep cave when seen through a telescope visually.


Sh2-115

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Mount Ci700 Celestron
Camera/filters:QHY 12
exposure: 10×900 sec


M52 and Bubble widefield

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi  Mount Ci700 Celestron
Camera/filters:QHY 12
exposure: 10×600 sec


Messier 52
(also known as M 52 or NGC 7654) is an open cluster in the Cassiopeia constellation. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1774. M52 can be seen from Earth with binoculars.

Due to interstellar absorption of light, the distance to M 52 is uncertain, with estimates ranging between 3,000 and 7,000 light years. One study identified 193 probable members of the cluster, with the brightest member being magnitude 11. [1]

Messier 52 is evaluated at about 35 million years old.

NGC 7635, also called the Bubble Nebula, Sharpless 162, or Caldwell 11, is a H II region[2] emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia. It lies close to the direction of the open cluster Messier 52. The “bubble” is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot, 8.7[2] magnitude young central star, the 15 ± 5 M☉[4] SAO 20575 (BD+60 2522).[7] The nebula is near a giant molecular cloud which contains the expansion of the bubble nebula while itself being excited by the hot central star, causing it to glow.[7] It was discovered in 1787 by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel.[6] The star SAO 20575 or BD+602522 is thought to have a mass of 10-40 Solar masses.


Flaming Star IC405

Flaming Star

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 10×600 Lum 6×600 RGB all 1xbin

IC 405 (also known as the Flaming Star Nebula, SH 2-229, or Caldwell 31) is an emission/reflection nebula[1] in the constellation Auriga, surrounding the bluish star AE Aurigae. It shines at magnitude +6.0. Its celestial coordinates are RA 05h 16.2m dec +34° 28′.[2] It surrounds the irregular variable star AE Aurigae and is located near the emission nebula IC 410, the open cluster M38, and the naked-eye K-class star Hassaleh. The nebula measures approximately 37.0′ x 19.0′, and lies about 1,500 light-years away.[2] It is believed that the proper motion of the central star can be traced back to the Orion’s Belt area.[2] The nebula is about 5 light-years across.[1


Cocoon Nebula

Cocoon with 12″ ACF

 

Optics/mount : 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
Exposure: 12×600 Lum, 8×400 RGB 2x2bin

Cocoon Widefield with Epsilon 180 f2,7

Cocoon
Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi  Mount Ci700 Celestron
Camera/filters:QHY 12
exposure: 19×600 sec

IC 5146 (also Caldwell 19, Sh 2-125, and the Cocoon Nebula) is a reflection/emissionnebula and Caldwell object in the constellation Cygnus. IC 5146 refers specifically to the star cluster and Sh2-125 to the nebula. It shines at magnitude +10.0/+9.3/+7.2Its celestial coordinates are RA 21h 53.5m, dec+47° 16′. It is located near the naked-eye star Pi Cygni, the open cluster NGC 7209 in Lacerta, and the bright open cluster M39. The cluster is about 4,000 ly away, and the central star that lights it formed about 100,000 years ago; the nebula is about 12 arcmins across, which is equivalent to a span of 15 light years. When viewing IC 5146, dark nebula Barnard 168 (B168) is an inseparable part of the experience, forming a dark lane that surrounds the cluster and projects westward forming the appearance of a trail behind the Cocoon


North America and Pelican Nebula Version HST

NGC 7000, the North America Nebula, is located in the constellation of Cygnus. It is a very large area of emission nebulosity extending some 2.5 degrees to the east of Deneb. The ‘NAN’ is well named for its shape – which is easily recognizeable as resembling the continent of North America. It was discovered in the early 1890s during experiments into wide field astrophotography. Several areas of nebulosity can be seen surrounding NGC 7000 including IC 5070, the Pelican Nebula to the west and IC 5068 to the south. The ‘Skull Nebula’ can also be seen between the North America and the Pelican nebulae.

The Pelican Nebula (also known as IC 5070) is an HII region associated with the North America Nebula. The nebula resembles a pelican in shape, hence the name. The Pelican Nebula is divided from its brighter, larger neighbor, the North America Nebula, by a molecular cloud filled with dark dust. This nebula is much studied because it has a particularly active mix of star formation and evolving gas clouds. The light from young energetic stars is slowly transforming cold gas to hot and causing an ionization front gradually to advance outward. Particularly dense filaments of cold gas are seen to still remain. Millions of years from now this nebula might no longer be known as the Pelican, as the balance and placement of stars and gas will leave something that appears completely different.

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astromik Ha S-II O-III
exposure: 10×600″ ha 6×600 S-II O-III


M8 M20 widefield

M8 M20 widefield

The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1747 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Seen with binoculars, it appears as a distinct oval cloudlike patch with a definite core. A fragile star cluster appears superimposed on it.

The Trifid Nebula (catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514) is an H II region located in Sagittarius. Its name means ‘divided into three lobes’. The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars, an emission nebula (the lower, red portion), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue portion) and a dark nebula (the apparent ‘gaps’ within the emission nebula that cause the trifid appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85). Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and colorful object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers

Optics/mount: 180 Epsilon f2,8 Takahashi Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
exposure: 10×600″ lum 5×300″ rgb all 2xbin


Iris nebula

NGC 7023 was observed 18 October 1794 by William Herschel. It is located about 3.5 degrees south west of Beta Cephei (Alfirk). This is a wonderful example of a reflection nebula. Its unusual structure gave rise to the name, the Iris Nebula. The nebula is illuminated by light for a Mag 6.8 star (HD200775) in its center. The bright blue light seen here is due to light being reflected off dust particles that survived the star’s birth. There are faint hints of red color surrounding the central star. This is evidence of some hydrogen emission taking place. Images of this object frequently capture the dense dust cloud that is resides in.

Optics/mount: 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB
exposure: 12×600″ lum 5×300″ rgb all 1xbin


Helix nebula

NGC 7293

The Helix Nebula (also known as The Helix, NGC 7293, or Caldwell 63) is a large planetary nebula (PN) located in the constellation Aquarius. Discovered by Karl Ludwig Harding, probably before 1824, this object is one of the closest to the Earth of all the bright planetary nebulae. The estimated distance is about 215 parsecs or 700 light-years. It is similar in appearance to the Ring Nebula, whose size, age, and physical characteristics are similar to the Dumbbell Nebula, varying only in its relative proximity and the appearance from the equatorial viewing angle. The Helix has often been referred to as the Eye of God on the Internet, since about 2003.

Optics/mount: 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon HA RGB
exposure: Ha18x900 Lum10x600 RGB10x300 all 2xbin


Vdb 142 Elephants Trunk HST Version and LRGB

Elephant trunk

The Elephant’s Trunk nebula
is a concentration of interstellar gas and dust in the star cluster IC 1396 – an ionized gas region located in the constellation Cepheus about 2,400 light years away from Earth. The piece of the nebula shown here is the dark, dense globule IC 1396A; it is commonly called the Elephant’s Trunk nebula because of its appearance at visible light wavelengths, where there is a dark patch with a bright, sinuous rim. The bright rim is the surface of the dense cloud that is being illuminated and ionized by a very bright, massive star that is just to the west of IC 1396A. (In the Figure above, the massive star is just to the left of the edge of the image.) The entire IC 1396 region is ionized by the massive star, except for dense globules that can protect themselves from the star’s harsh ultraviolet rays.

Optics/mount: 12″ACF 2.7m AP-Reduzer Alt-5
Camera/filters: Atik 11002 Astrodon LRGB HA5nm
exposure: 10×600 Lum 6×600 RGB all 1xbin